Fall 2011

Cross-listed in Medieval Studies (MDVL)

MDVL / ARTH 111 - Ancient to Medieval Art

Credit: 4 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Literature and the Arts course.

CRN 37084 lecture  AL1 

12:00 PM - 12:50 PM  MWF room 134 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall 

Discussion sections begin after the first lecture.

Instructor:  J Senseney

The arts of Byzantium and Western Europe from the early Christian era to the Renaissance.

MDVL 201 / CWL 253 / ENGL 202 - Medieval Literature and Culture

Credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Literature and the Arts, and Western Compartv Cult course.

CRN 33892  lecture- discussion  D 

11:00 AM - 11:50 AM  MWF room 119 English Bldg 

British and continental authors (including Chaucer) read in modern English.

MDVL / ARTH 222 - Medieval Art

Credit: 3 hours.

CRN 57499 lecture  AH 

9:00 AM - 9:50 AM MWF room 302 Architecture Bldg.

The arts of Byzantium and Western Europe from the early Christian era to the Renaissance.

MDVL / GWS / HIST 245 - Women & Gender in Pre-Modern Europe

Credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Hist&Philosoph Perspect, and Western Compartv Cult course.

CRN 34349  lecture- discussion  A 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM  MWF room 165 Noyes Laboratory 

Instructor:  Megan McLaughlin

An introduction to some major issues in the history of women and gender from the fifth to the seventeenth century. Among the subjects to be discussed are the impact of class on gender roles, women‘s work and access to property, the relationship between the public and private spheres of life, women‘s roles in the conversion of Europe to Christianity and in The Reformation, and the connection between the misogynist tradition and premodern women's sense of self.

MDVL / SCAN / CWL 251 - Viking Mythology

Credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Hist&Philosoph Perspect, and Western Compartv Cult course.

CRN 58535  lecture- discussion D 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM     MWF     

Instructor:  B. Malekin

Studies pre-Christian beliefs of the Germanic peoples as reflected primarily in medieval Icelandic prose and poetry (in translation).

MDVL / SCAN / CWL 252 - Viking Sagas in Translation

Credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Literature and the Arts, and Western Compartv Cult course.

CRN 48307  lecture- discussion  D 02:00 PM - 02:50 PM  MWF room G46 Foreign Languages Bldg 

Instructor:  B. Malekin

Studies Old Norse-Icelandic literature: kings' sagas, family sagas, mythical-heroic sagas, and romances. Texts and lectures in English.

MDVL / HIST / RLST 345 - Medieval Civilization

Credit: 3 hours.

CRN 51285 lecture- discussion  A 02:00 PM - 02:50 PM  MWF room 145 Armory

 Instructor:  Megan McLaughlin

Economy, society and culture in Europe during the High Middle ages (11th through 14th centuries): this course focuses on the relationship between medieval social and economic structures, and such cultural manifestations as epic and romantic literature, gothic and romanesque architecture, scholastic theology and monasticism.

MDVL / HIST / RLST 346 - The Age of the Renaissance

Credit: 3 hours.

CRN 43284  lecture- discussion  09:30 AM - 10:50 AM  TR 

 Instructor:  David Price

This is an introduction to the cultural history of Europe in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. We will begin with some background study of the political and cultural meanings of the term "Renaissance." This will involve an assessment of how learning, science, technology, and new cultural ideals changed art. - From that basis, we will begin an examination of the social and political contexts for Renaissance culture. We will consider the nature and the purposes of the arts in three different types of settings: at the imperial court (Charles V), at papal courts (emphasis on Julius II, Leo X, and Clement VII), and in independent cities (Florence and Nuremberg). Our goal is to learn about the major sources of patronage as well as the social and political functions of art. The focus on specific settings will also help us appreciate cultural diversity and distinctiveness.

MDVL / HIST 443 - Byzantine Empire AD 284-717

Credit: 3 or 4 hours

CRN 46627 lecture- discussion  U3 

CRN 46628 lecture- discussion  G4 

12:30 PM - 01:50 PM  TR room 205 Gregory Hall 

Instructor:  Rallph Mathisen

The course will examine the political, social, economic, military, institutional, religious and cultural development of the Early Byzantine Empire focusing on the reigns of Diocletian (AD 284-305) through the Heraclian Dynasty (AD 610-717).

MDVL / ENGL 514 - Medieval Paleography

Credit:  4 hours.

CRN 34489 lecture- discussion  G 03:00 PM - 04:50 PM  M room 107A English Bldg.

Instructor:  Charles D. Wright

The course will cover the major European scripts from Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages, focusing on Latin scripts (from early Roman cursive to Gothic), but also including major vernacular scripts (all of which were based on Latin scripts).  In addition to learning the history and development of the scripts themselves, we will learn about medieval scribal practices such as abbreviation, punctuation, and mise-en-page (layout), as well as the fundamentals of codicology from the preparation of parchment to the construction of manuscript books (including how to collate a manuscript).  A basic reading knowledge of Latin is required, but students whose focus is on a particular medieval vernacular literature can write seminar papers on those vernacular scripts or manuscripts.  We will work with facsimiles but will also conduct some meetings in the Rare Book Room and work with actual manuscripts in our collections.  We will also read classic essays on medieval palaeography and manuscript studies.  Each student will give a seminar report on one particular script (Latin or vernacular), complete exercises (transcriptions, etc.) throughout the semester, and write a seminar paper (on a script, a scribal practice or codicological topic, or on a particular scribe, manuscript, or group of manuscripts).

Other Courses on Medieval Topics

HIST/EALC 120 East Asian Civilizations

Credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Hist&Philosoph Perspect, and Non-Western Cultures course.

Lecture  AL1 1:00 PM - 01:50 PM  MW  room 228 Natural History Bldg 

Students must register for one discussion and one lecture section.

Instructor:  Ronald Toby 

This course introduces the common ideas and institutions that link China, Korea, and Japan in a broadly shared, regional civilization, as well as the distinct cultural practices and institutions each has developed for itself. We focus on two historical processes: First, the making of a 'civilization,' a broad cultural system spanning East Asia, in which classical Chinese civilization, language, and culture were key common elements within each of the region’s cultures, and the interplay of indigenous values, social practices in those cultures. And second, unique historical developments in each of these countries that have produced their distinct cultures within the broader civilization. We examine major themes, that is, that make ‘East Asian Civilization’ a coherent whole, that is, but also what distinguishes its principal constituent regional cultures—China, Korea, and Japan—from earliest times to the dawn of the modern age. 

While we cover the broad range of political, socio-ecomomic, and cultural developments, our main focus is on the common values, practices, and ideas that make for a civilization, working from both modern texts, and materials that contemporaries wrote (or painted) themselves, including contemporary philosophical and historical materials, diaries and belles-lettres, religious or political tracts. Our hope is to understand not just 'what happened,' but how people of various stations in life—from aristocrats and emperors, to peasants and pirates—experienced the world around them. To that end, our book-length supplemental readings are literary works. The Analects of Confucius has been a central, canonical text across East Asia; The Gossamer Years is the memoir of a 10th-c. Japanese aristocratic woman; The Death of Woman Wang focuses on the lives of ordinary Chinese women of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911); Lady Hyegyo˘ng, wife of a prince and mother of a king, was caught up in tragedy and intrigue at the late 18th-c. Korean court; and Musui’s Story is the autobiography of a 19th-c. samurai whose life story may upset all your preconceptions about what it meant to be a ‘samurai.’

Our goals for History/EALC 120 include developing a knowledge and understanding of the major trends, processes, and value systems characterizing the cultures comprising East Asia, on the one hand, and an appreciation for the methods and practices of history as a discipline and approach to human experience, on the other.

EALC 398 Colloquium in EALC:  Heike monogatari (Tales of the Heike) and the Medieval Mind

Credit: 3 hours.

May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

CRN 31761  lecture- discussion E 2:00 PM - 04:20 PM  M room 1118  Foreign Languages Bldg

Instructor:  Elizabeth Oyler

This seminar will focus on Heike monogatari, the medieval Japanese war tale chronicling the Genpei War (1180-1185).  We will read Heike monogatari in its entirety and situate it within the historical contexts, cultural practices and beliefs, and literary and dramatic traditions to which it is a response and of which it is an iconic representation.  Additional readings will include medieval travel narratives, essays, and drama, as well as secondary criticism.  Prerequisites: EALC 305 (CWL 311), EALC 226, or permission of instructor. 

RLST 494  Topics in Religious Thought:  Augustine

Credit:  3 or 4 hours.

CRN 46556  lecture- discussion  A3

CRN 46556  lecture- discussion  A4

3:00-4:20 TR  Room TBA

Instructor:  Richard Layton

Augustine (354-430) had the most enduring impact of any writer of the early Christian church.  He was also one of the most multi-faceted thinkers of any age.  This class will explore Augustine and his age, surveying his writings in connection with both the developments of Christianity and the Greco-Roman world during his era, and the subsequent appropriation of his thought from the medieval to the modern periods.  We will chart the development of Augustine’s own thought from his early involvement with Manicheism, through his engagement with Platonism, and the controversies in which he was embroiled as bishop of Hippo.  Readings will include his most famous writings, such as Confessions and City of God, as well as lesser known dialogues, controversial and polemical writings, exegesis, and moral treatises. 

Landscape Architecture 593  Islamic & South Asian Landscapes

Credit: 2 hours.

CRN 56952 lecture  DFR  5:00 PM - 06:30 PM     MW      Meets 17-Oct-11 - 07-Dec-11 room 18 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall

Instructor:  D. Fairchild Ruggles

Topics in Islamic and South Asian cultural landscape history, including historiography, methodology and recent scholarship. An advanced course that requires disciplinary familiarity with research on the built environment, material culture and visual culture.

 

 

Monday

 

 

Tuesday

 

Wednesday

 

Thursday

 

Friday

9:00

 

9:30

222 Medieval Art

 

 

 

 

346 Age  Renaissance

222 Medieval Art

 

 

 

346 Age  Renaissance

222 Medieval Art

 

10:00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11:00

201 Medieval Lit.

 

256 Women & Gender Pre-Modern

 

251 Viking Myth

 

 

201 Medieval Lit.

 

256 Women & Gender Pre-Modern

 

251 Viking Myth

 

 

201 Medieval Lit.

 

256 Women & Gender Pre-Modern

 

251 Viking Myth

 

12:00

 

 

12:30

111 Ancient & Medieval Art

 

 

 

 

 

443 Byantine Empire

111 Ancient & Medieval Art

 

 

 

 

443 Byantine Empire

111 Ancient & Medieval Art

 

1:00

150 East Asian Civ.

 

 

150 East Asian Civ.

 

 

150 East Asian Civ.

 

2:00

252 Viking Sagas

 

345 Medieval Civ.

 

398 Tales of Heike (to 4:20pm)

 

 

252 Viking Sagas

 

345 Medieval Civ.

 

 

252 Viking Sagas

 

345 Medieval Civ.

 

3:00

514 Mdvl Paleography

(to 4:50pm)

494 Augustine

 

494 Augustine

 

5:00

 

593 Islamic/S.Asian Landscapes (to 6:30pm)

 

593 Islamic/S.Asian Landscapes (to 6:30pm)